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Meadowlark Nursery Current Availability
Meadowlark Availability October 22, 2017[...]
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Iris louisiana `Black Gamecock'

It's time to plant irises in the garden to assure bloom this year.  We have a large selection of iris groups including the  Bearded (germanica), Japanese (ensata), Siberian (sibirica), and Louisiana irises.  The Bearded group is the first to bloom in the garden, followed by Siberians,  then Japanese & Louisiana.  The reblooming bearded iris also give a repeat bloom in the fall, for a long season of bloom.  The louisiana iris shown here is one of many vibrant colors that include white, shades of blue and purple, magenta, rust, and maroon.  Large flat-topped blooms and affinity for water make them suitable for ponds, water-logged or poorly drained sites, edges of lawns.  They are robust growers with the ability to colonize where happy.

Iris sibirica `Steve'

This image shows just one of the many shades that  siberian iris come in, and are all gorgeous.  Arising early in the spring, usually after the bearded iris bloom in the garden, these iris are hardy, deer resistant, clay soil tolerant, and very long-lived.  They are even drought resistant if you don't mind cutting back the foliage in late summer.  In gardens plagued with heavy soil they make a good substitute for the native varieties of iris such as douglasianas and pacific coast hybrids which do not thrive in such conditions.

Iris germanica `Beverly Sills'

This reblooming bearded iris variety, Beverly Sills, is an old favorite.  She features intense peachy-pink blooms in early spring with a repeat bloom in fall.  This is only one example of the luscious colors in the iris germanica group and are easy to grow - deer, heat and drought tolerant and require little maintenance.  Please inquire as to which varieties and quantities are available, as they change drastically throughout the season.

Iris unguicularis

This little known species is also known as "Winter Iris" as it blooms sporadically in midwinter from November through March.  It's sweetly scented blooms adorn the clean clumps of foliage at a time when not much else is blooming in the garden.   Non-demanding and drought resistant, plantings can be let to dry out in summer.  The painted petals are intriguing when studied up close (as long as you ignore the slug damage) and the plants always look fresh - evergreen through summer if watered occasionally with little cleanup necessary.